Five Women, Five Ways We Approach #BalanceforBetter at Resideo

Updated on  March  8, 2019

This March we’re celebrating both Women’s History Month and International Women’s Day with the idea of #BalanceforBetter.

 

 

For the five global leaders profiled below, “balance” is more than just a catchphrase. It’s how they live and work every day, in Resideo offices all across the globe, from the United States to India to Europe. As team leaders, as parents, as daughters and citizens — these women contribute to #BalanceforBetter at Resideo in everything they do, setting an example for the women and men with whom they work. 


At Resideo, we believe our products and our people are unlike any other. Our diverse workforce fosters an environment where all of our people, no matter their background, feel respected and included, allowing our teams to focus on developing the best possible products for our customers.

We salute these women and the diverse teams they lead at Resideo. With their leadership, their vision and their drive to succeed, these women exemplify the best of our company and our community. We’re excited to see the future they’re helping us to create.

All in the Family: Sarah Fleming, senior customer service supervisor, Motherwell, United Kingdom

 

“My aim in life is to ensure my son feels the love, support and security I did growing up.”
 As a child, Sarah Fleming had one thing every little girl needs: A powerful role model. 

Her mother, Margaret Fleming, worked for Resideo’s heritage company, Honeywell. “It was my mother’s first and only job,” Sarah says.

Margaret Fleming, still working nearly 50 years later, inspired Sarah, now a team supervisor for Resideo Customer Care in Motherwell, United Kingdom. The experiences of mother and daughter provide a poignant illustration of how the environment for working women has changed over the years.

“When my mother had me, it was very uncommon for women to go back to work,” Sarah says. “But she did, within a matter of weeks. Now women are eligible for months of leave, with benefits included and much more.”

Margaret set an example for Sarah of how to balance success at work with parenting. “My aim in life is to ensure my son feels the love, support and security I did growing up,” Sarah says.

The business is different today than it was when Sarah’s mother started out at Honeywell. With new platforms to work from, new service portals and a shifting company culture, Sarah sees a bright future, for both the company and for its customers.

“I’m proud to be here,” she says. “I’m proud to be a part of all this.”


Essence of Innovation: Sonali   Samantaray,   global engineering manager,   Bangalore, India

Sonali Samantaray works on Resideo’s data analytics platform. And she loves a good challenge.

“My motivation to come to work comes from the learning I get out of different situations, which also brings out the best in me,” she says. “Every day is fun — there’s never a dull moment and each day is full of challenges.”

Sonali is a Resideo global engineering manager based in Bangalore, India. She’s developing software to enhance the experience of people who use Resideo products. “Every piece of code you write is with a clear purpose to solve a problem statement. How uniquely and effectively you solve these problems is the essence of innovation.”

She advises younger women who are thinking of careers in software development to embrace the challenge. “Stay hungry, stay foolish,” she says. “Persistence does pay off, so never give up until you excel.”


Confidence is Key: Joanne Rowe,   ADI   branch manager, Toronto, Canada

Joanne Rowe says International Women’s Day is a celebration of women moving forward, and Joanne herself is an excellent example of a woman on the move. Starting her ADI career on the operational side of the business, her work ethic and commitment to excellence earned her several promotions. She now leads a large, impactful team as the branch manager for ADI Toronto.

Joanne’s advice: “Don’t be afraid to fly above the radar.”

Women are often taught at a young age to seek approval and harmony, says Joanne, but instead she argues that we should instill confidence in young women and encourage them to challenge ideas.

“Self-confidence is key,” Joanne says. “I refuse to have best supporting actress syndrome in my industry. I am a strong woman with strong views. At ADI my ideas are welcomed, and my success is celebrated.”


An Expert Mentor: Teresa Luterbach, key account manager, Minneapolis, Minnesota

Teresa Luterbach is responsible for managing and growing Resideo’s national account business. With a decade and a half of experience, she is extremely knowledgeable about the customer base and viewed as a leader within the team.

“I love that I can mentor my team members and help them build relationships with our customers,” Teresa says.

She believes her team is the best part of her job. “We have fun, and we support each other like family,” she says.

Family is important to Teresa, who adds that it’s her own family that motivates and inspires her on a daily basis. “I am a role model, not just for my children, but for my extended family as well,” says Teresa. “I’m proud to be a positive example to them of a successful woman in the workplace.”


A Champion for Integrity: Jodi DeDomenico, chief financial officer of ADI North America, Melville, New York

Jodi DeDomenico joined ADI 18 months ago as CFO for North America. In that brief time, she has cemented herself as a vital leader, partnering with executive leadership to project financials, deliver efficiencies and process improvements, and ensure integrity of ADI financial results.

That commitment to working with integrity inspires Jodi to lead by example and speak up when she sees a problem.

“It is so vital that if we spot an issue, no matter in what part of the organization, no matter what level we are, we tackle it and don’t pass over it,” Jodi says. “We all have a role to play in each other’s success and we need to ‘ring the bell’ when we spot an issue.”

Jodi’s inspiration at work and in life is her mother, who worked as an office manager, administrative assistant and, in Jodi’s words, “the toughest bill collector I have ever seen,” for her father’s home-based business.

“I still wonder how she did it all with seven kids,” Jodi says. “She worked hard and expected it from everyone else, but she also had the loudest laugh in the room. She was joy and hard work all wrapped up in a bow.”

To Jodi, International Women’s Day represents more than her career, or her role as a mother, wife, sister and friend. “It is a day to focus not only on our successes but on the real-life struggles women face all over the world. It makes me count my blessings.”